Resources

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Recursos en español (Resources in Spanish)

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Hot Topics

  • Gang and Gun Enhancements January 2016

    People v. Le addressed a complicated issue about the legal rules for when a criminal defendant can be subjected to both a gang enhancement and a gun enhancement for the same crime.

  • Information Re: Proposition 64 (Legalization of Marijuana) November 2016 new

    California passed Proposition 64 in November 2016.  This Proposition makes it legal for adults age 21 or older to possess, use, buy, transport, or give away small amounts of marijuana and concentrated cannabis for non-medical use, and reduces the penalties for many marijuana and cannabis crimes.  People who were convicted of marijuana and cannabis crimes in the past can petition for re-sentencing, re-designation, or dismissal in accord with the new laws.  However, prisoners and jail inmates should understand that it is still a felony (and still a violation of CDCR rules) for a prisoner or inmate to possess or use marijuana or cannabis.

  • Information Re: Proposition 57 November 2016 new

    This letter summarizes the changes to the laws enacted in November 2016 through Proposition 57, and the current status of how the changes are being carried out.

  • SB260/SB261 Youthful Offender Parole Guide May 2016 new

    This Youthful Offender Parole Guide provides detailed information about the laws that allow many prisoners to seek early parole for crimes they committed prior to age 23.  The Guide also has practical tips for convincing the BPH to grant early parole.

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Arizona Prison Conditions

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California Criminal Cases

  • Plea Bargain October 2013

    Challenging a conviction or sentence after accepting a plea bargain.

  • Collateral Attacks on Criminal Convictions by State and Federal Petitions for Writ of Habeas Corpus August 2009

    Spanish version

    A “collateral attack” (collateral means “indirect” or “secondary”) on your conviction or sentence can be started by filing a petition for writ of habeas corpus.

  • Federal Habeas Corpus Manual January 2015

    A federal habeas petition can only challenge a conviction or the length of a sentence (including some issues involving denial of prison sentence credits or parole).

  • Gang and Gun Enhancements January 2016

    People v. Le addressed a complicated issue about the legal rules for when a criminal defendant can be subjected to both a gang enhancement and a gun enhancement for the same crime.

  • Three Strikes Law July 2015

    Spanish version July 2014

    Includes information about People v. Vargas, new second stricker credit and parole policies, Proposition 47, Proposition 36 and People v. Johnson/Machado.

  • Direct Appeals of Criminal Convictions January 2012

    Spanish version

    The information in this letter applies only if you were convicted of one or more felonies (or a mix of felonies and misdemeanors) in California state court; there are different forms and procedures for appeals in cases that involve only misdemeanors

  • Proposition 47 March 2015

    Spanish version

    In November, 2014, the voters of California passed Proposition 47, which changes many property and drug-possession offenses to regular misdemeanors.  Learn more by seeing our Information re: Proposition 47.

  • Information Re: Proposition 64 (Legalization of Marijuana) November 2016 new

    California passed Proposition 64 in November 2016.  This Proposition makes it legal for adults age 21 or older to possess, use, buy, transport, or give away small amounts of marijuana and concentrated cannabis for non-medical use, and reduces the penalties for many marijuana and cannabis crimes.  People who were convicted of marijuana and cannabis crimes in the past can petition for re-sentencing, re-designation, or dismissal in accord with the new laws.  However, prisoners and jail inmates should understand that it is still a felony (and still a violation of CDCR rules) for a prisoner or inmate to possess or use marijuana or cannabis.

  • Johnson v. United States July 2016 new

    In Johnson v. United States the United States Supreme Court examined a federal sentencing law called the Armed Career Criminal Act (ACCA) and found one of its enhancement provisions to be unconstitutionally vague. Some criminal justice attorneys argue that there are similar vagueness problems with portions of California’s criminal laws.

  • LWOP and Other Lengthy Sentences for Juveniles and Youthful Offenders May 2016 new

    Overview of the case law, statutes and policies reforming the criminal laws that apply to juveniles (under age 18) or youthful offenders (under age 23) who are sentenced to life without parole, life with the possibility of parole, or long determinate (set length) sentences.  These laws allow some juveniles or youthful offenders to get re-sentenced to lesser terms or to be considered for early parole.

  • Information Re: Proposition 57 November 2016 new

    This letter summarizes the changes to the laws enacted in November 2016 through Proposition 57, and the current status of how the changes are being carried out.

  • State Habeas Corpus Form January 2010

    Form MC-275 is used to challenge criminal convictions or conditions of confinement.

  • State Habeas Corpus Manual November 2008

    The traditional use of habeas corpus allows prisoners to challenge their convictions and sentences.  It also allows prisoners to challenge parole revocations and denials of parole by the Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) or the governor.

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California Parole Suitability, Conditions and Revocation

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California Prison Conditions

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General

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Recent Projects and Development

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